ENG 206: Modern British Literature
Section MA: Monday/Wednesday, 2:00-3:15 pm
                   M 211

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-203
516-572-7185, ext. 25686

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates


Thursday, May 14:
I have graded the final essays. As a reminder, the instructions for your final essay (or essays) were explicit: “While you may use any of the materials from the textbook, including introductions, prose works, or poems, plays, and short stories, use of additional secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure.” Two students failed the assignment for plagiarism.

Your grades for the semester will be posted at MyNCC (login required) and are listed below by ID number. Final grades below contain generous scaling, including bonus points and adjustments. In addition, all extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page. Therefore, do not email me to ask about “extra credit” or other things you can do to bring your average up since you were “almost passing” or “just one point away” from the A and so on; in reality, you were closer to five or six points away.

Final essays may be picked up in the Fall 2015 semester, by appointment only. Enjoy the summer break.

ID Attendance Quizzes/ Writing Essay 1 (Revised) Essay 2 (Revised) Midterm (Revised) Final Essay Adjusted Average Earned Grade
N00491710 92.0 88.92 B C 90.45 A
N00514014               UW
N00693109               W
N00716514 76.0 41.79 D C+ B 74.22 C
N00734054 80.2 52.55 C C–/D 76.49 C+
N00746014 76.0 97.74 0 0 B 59.86 D
N00747938 64.0 42.85 0 0 C+ 0 27.64 F
N00754911 67.0 13.74 0 0 35.43 F
N00760311               UW
N00764129               W
N00769282 88.0 50.20 B C+ 82.27 B
N00772029 76.0 90.14 C C C 78.62 C+
N00774163 87.5 83.67 B 0 C 71.34 C
N00776131 92.0 42.44 B+ C+ 81.15 B
N00776179 94.8 74.37 A A B+ A 100.00 A
N00779090 82.0 10.91 D 70.13 C
N00784826 76.0 56.18 C 75.09 C+
N00787111 100.0 90.14 B B+ B 95.15 A
N00790315 84.0 69.93 C+ C F 72.69 C
N00790905 100.0 69.12 C+ C 86.21 B+
N00795837               W
N00796509 91.0 39.53 D 73.88 C
N00797064 88.0 44.38 72.82 C
N00798330 88.0 39.29 C+ B 77.80 C+
N00804032 100.0 70.65 C+ C+ C+ C+ 87.10 B+
N00809031 95.7 100.00 B+ 91.32 A
N00824161 71.0 16.17 0 C A 69.67 C
N00826641               W
MAX: 100.00 100.00 A A B+ A 100.00 A
MIN: 64.00 10.91 0 0 0 0 27.64 F
MEDIAN: 87.50 52.55 C C 75.79 C
MODE: 76.00 90.14 0 0 0 #N/A #N/A
AVERAGE: 84.63 56.94 F F D 74.76 C

 

 

 

Monday, 11 May:
As announced repeatedly, your final essay was due today at the start of the class period. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Once final grades have been calculated—before Friday, ideally—your grades will be available online, both here (by Student ID number) and at MyNCC (login required). Therefore, do not email me to ask about your grade, or to ask for “extra credit” to bring your average up; final grades will already contain generous scaling, and all extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page.

Saturday, May 9:
As announced in class, on Monday, May 11, your take-home final essay is due at the start of the class period. Late or incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Essays must be typed, in 12-point Times New Roman, double-spaced, and stapled when submitted. As per instructions, you have two choices:

A. Using three of the following topics, write three short essays of at least 250-300 words apiece.

OR

B. Select one of the following topics, and compose one essay of at least 750-1000 words.

Remember that you are not summarizing the works, but responding to them in a critical manner. Include evidence or examples from the specific texts that you are writing about, but do not retell the story, and do not copy directly except when quoting. Remember to incorporate sources correctly: use signal phrases and document with parenthetical citations and a Works Cited reference at the end of the essay. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure.

If you wish your final essay returned, you may either bring a self-addressed, stamped envelope and I will mail it back to you, or you may pick it up next semester during my office hours. (by appointment)

Finally, I will not sign Withdrawal or Incomplete forms or provide last-minute extra credit; don't even ask.

Sunday, May 3:
Just a reminder: as per the syllabus, the readings for Monday are as follows:

Voices from World War II (2704-2706)

Virginia Woolf (2706-2710): from Three Guineas, “[As a Woman I Have No Country]”
Pablo Picasso, “Guernica” (2711-2712)
Henry Reed (2714-2715): from Lessons of the War, “Naming of Parts”
Randall Jarrell  “Death of the Ball Turret Gunner” (handout)

Nation, Race, and Language (2718-21)

Claude McKay (2721-23): “Old England,” “If We Must Die”; “America” (handout)
Grace Nichols (2751-54): “Epilog,” “ The Fat Black Woman Goes Shopping,” “Wherever I Hang Me Knickers”

Sunday, April 26:
As per the schedule, the readings for Monday are as follows:

T. S. Eliot (2521-2547): “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “The Hollow Men,”  “Journey Of The Magi”

In addition, Essay 2will be returned, and we will discuss (optional) revisions.

For Wednesday, April 28, the readings are:

W. H. Auden (2677-2687): “Musιe des Beaux Arts,” “In Memory of W. B. Yeats”

Sunday, April 12:
Remember the changes to the schedule: The readings for Monday are as follows:

The Twentieth Century and After  and Timeline  (1886-1913)
Empire and National Identity (1636-40)
Anonymous:  Proclamation of an Irish Republic
(1646-47)
James Anthony Froud: from 
The English in the West Indies (1649-52)
John Jacob Thomas: from Froudacity (1652-54)
Joseph Chamberlain: from The True Conception of Empire (1662-64)
John Hobson
: The Political Significance of Imperialism
(1665-57)

For Wednesday, the readings are:

Voices from World War I (2016-18):
Siegfried Sassoon (2023-24): “
They”
Isaac Rosenberg (2029-31): “Break of Day in the Trenches,”  “
Louse Hunting”
Wilfred Owen (2034-37): “
Anthem for Doomed Youth,” “Dulce et Decorum Est”

In addition, Monday is also your last chance (probably) to ask me about additional topics for Essay 2, due on Monday, April 20.

Finally, I have posted another possible FREE extra credit opportunity on the main page, if you happen to find yourself in New Haven in the next few weeks: The Critique of Reason: Romantic Art, 1760-1860 at Yale University Art Gallery.

Sunday, April 5:
Now that break is over and the semester is more than half over,  it is time to start looking ahead to the next few weeks.

You should have finished reading Hard Times during the break; since we barely discussed even the first part, we will probably spend the whole week on it.
Also, we will discuss further revisions to the schedule, as well as additional topic possibilities for Essay 2.

Finally, as indicated in class and posted below, optional Midterm Revisions are due Monday, April 6. Revisions should be substantially revised and expanded into a well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essay of at least three to five pages (750 to 1000 words). Revisions must be submitted with the original graded bluebook essay attached

Friday, March 27:
I have posted information on the main page about extra credit: the Writing Center Spring 2015 MLA Research and Documentation Seminars. If students attend one of the MLA workshops and provide evidence of attendance (be sure to sign in at the workshop so I get the email notification!) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response, they can receive one additional point extra credit point. Note: you may not attend the workshop more than once on different dates for additional points, nor may you attend the APA workshop for credit. Details about APA workshops are provided for your information only. See also the official flyer, here.

In addition, optional Midterm Revisions are due Monday, April 6, when we return from break. You may submit a revised version of your midterm exam; however, rather than merely a “corrected” version of the original essay, it must be substantially revised and expanded: a well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essay of at least three to five pages (750 to 1000 words) and must be submitted with the original graded bluebook essay attached. Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade. 

Note: If you did not pick up your blue book in class on Wednesday, I left it for you in the folder attached to my office door, Y-203. I also sent a group email to the entire class, announcing that students had to pick up their blue books if they wished to submit a revision.

Sunday, March 8:
Make sure you have read through Vol. III of Frankenstein: finish the novel before class, as there will be a quiz.

Also, remember that the readings formerly assigned for Monday, March 9 have been added to the readings for Wednesday, March 11.
For Wednesday you should complete all of the assigned readings:

The Victorian Age and Timeline (1016-1043)

Thomas Carlyle (1044-48): from Past and Present (1067-76)

John Stuart Mill (1086-88): from On Liberty (1095-1104)

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1156-59): “Ulysses,” “Break, Break, Break” (1170-74)

Robert Browning (1275-8): “Rabbi Ben Ezra” (1322-8); “Fra Lippo Lippi” (1300-09); “My Last Duchess” (1282-3); Matthew Arnold (1369-73): “Dover Beach” (1387); Gerard Manley Hopkins (1546-48): “God’s Grandeur” (1548); “Pied Beauty” (1551); “Spring and Fall” (1553-54)

Finally, optional revisions of Essay 1 are due Wednesday. Remember that you must see me during office hours or visit the Writing Center in order to submit a revision. My office hours next week are still 11:00 am–12:00 noon on Monday and 1:00–2:00 pm on Tuesday and Thursday.

Wednesday, March 4:
All classes, including online classes, and activities on Thursday, March 5 prior to 5:30 pm are canceled.  Campus services, other than Public Safety and Physical Plant, will not be available prior to 5:30 pm on March 5.  All classes and activities will resume starting 5:30 pm Thursday, March 5.  For further updates, please refer to the Nassau Community College website at www.ncc.edu.

Consequently, I will not be available to discuss your essay revisions tomorrow.
If you need to see me, my office hours next week are still 11:00 am–12:00 noon on Monday and 1:00–2:00 pm on Tuesday and Thursday.

Thursday, February 19:
I hope you have had a relaxing and productive break.
Now that it is almost over, however, a few notes are in order:

Due to an error, Wednesday, February 18 is listed on the revised schedule as a class day; it obviously was not. Instead, the readings listed for that day should be completed for Monday, February 23: John Keats (901-3), “On First Looking into Chapman's Homer” (904), “ La Belle Dame Sans Merci ” (923-4), “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (927-931). I will distribute a new, corrected schedule in class next week; in the meantime, you should continue reading Frankenstein, or begin it if you have not done so; we will start it on Wednesday and there will be a quiz on Volume I.

Also, alternative topic selections for Essay 1 were due before break. As nobody spoke to me or submitted a proposal, I will assume everyone is writing on one of the four assigned topics from the syllabus. This essay is due on Wednesday, February 25, and should be a clear, well-developed, coherent, thoughtful, and properly documented (MLA format) argumentative essay of at least five to seven pages (1000-1250 words minimum). I have no doubt we will spend part of Monday's class discussing the essay, especially for those who have given the assignment little to no thought to the assignment thus far.

Tuesday, February 10:
As a reminder that, as per the syllabus, all readings must be completed by the day indicated on the schedule, and that class may begin with a short (five- to ten-minute) quiz or writing assignment on the readings for the day, at the instructor’s discretion. I would suggest that you make sure you are familiar with the specific texts and authors I mentioned for tomorrow; if you have not already done so, read  “Expostulation and Reply” and “The Tables Turned” (280-282) by William Wordsworth; “The Lime-Tree Bower My Prison,” “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,”  “Kubla Khan” (441-462); “Frost at Midnight” (477-79) by  Coleridge; “She Walks in Beauty” by Byron; and “Mutability,” “To Wordsworth,” “Ozymandias” (776) and “To a Skylark” (834-6) by Shelley.

Friday, February 6:
Again, I am keeping a watchful eye on predictions for the next storm.
In the event that  classes are suspended or delayed on Monday and/or Tuesday, information will be posted on the college website, www.NCC.edu.
It will also be posted here when available, along with any necessary schedule changes.

Tuesday, February 3:
I have posted information on the main page about extra credit: the Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops. If students attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance along with a typed one- to two-page personal response, they can receive one additional point per workshop. Note: you may not attend the same workshop (for example “Building Compound Sentences”) on different dates for additional points. See also the official flyer, here.

Monday, February 2:
Updated at 5:45 pm
This does not affect our class, but note:
All classes, including online classes, and activities on Tuesday, February 3 prior to 1:00 pm are cancelled.  Campus services, other than Public Safety and Physical Plant, will not be available prior to 1:00 pm.  All classes and activities will resume starting 1:00 pm Tuesday, February 3.  For further updates, please refer to the Nassau Community College website at www.ncc.edu.

Due to today's classes being cancelled, I have adjusted the schedule—again.
Changes have been posted on both the main page and syllabus.
Be sure to read the following for Wednesday:

William Blake (112-116)

From Songs of Innocence  (118-125) (see image of Blake’s engraving here)

“Introduction” (see image here )
“The Lamb” (image)
“The Little Black Boy” (image, also here)
“The Chimney Sweeper” (image)
“Holy Thursday” (image )

From Songs of Experience  (125-135) (see image here)

“Introduction” (image)
“Holy Thursday” (image)
“The Chimney Sweeper” (image)
“The Sick Rose” (image)
“The Tyger” (image)
“
London” (image)

Sunday, February 1:
All classes, including online classes, and activities on Monday, February 2 are cancelled.  Campus services, other than Public Safety and Physical Plant, will not be available on Monday, February 2.  For further updates, please refer to the Nassau Community College website at www.ncc.edu.

Schedule adjustments will be made accordingly and announced in class when we resume, as well as posted here and on both the main page and syllabus.

Saturday, January 31:
I am keeping a watchful eye on predictions for this Sunday evening's storm.
If classes are suspended or delayed, information will be posted on the college website, www.NCC.edu.
It will also be posted here when available, along with any necessary schedule changes.

Tuesday, January 27:
As no announcements have yet been made concerning classes on Wednesday, just assume that we will be meeting as scheduled.
Read the pages that were originally intended for Monday's class:

The Romantic Period and Timeline (2-30):

The Revolution Controversy and the “Spirit of the Age” (183-4)

Edmund Burke: from Reflections on the Revolution in France (187-94)
Mary Wollstonecraft: from A Vindication of teh Rights of Men (also here)
(194-99)
Thomas Paine: from Rights of Man
(199-203)
Mary Wollstonecraft: from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (208-239)

We will discuss further changes to the schedule tomorrow.
In the event that classes tomorrow are cancelled or postponed, schedule adjustments will be made accordingly.
They will be announced in class when we resume, as well as posted here and on the
both the main page and syllabus.

Monday, January 26:
All classes, including online classes, and activities that begin after 12:15 pm are cancelled on Monday, January 26. Campus services, other than Public Safety and Physical Plant will not be available after 12:15 pm on Monday, January 26. All classes, including online classes and activities on Tuesday, January 27 are cancelled. Campus services, other than Public Safety and Physical Plant, will not be available during the day and evening on Tuesday, January 27. For further updates, please refer to the Nassau Community College website at www.ncc.edu. Schedule adjustments will be made accordingly and announced in class when we resume, as well as posted here and on the both the main page and syllabus.

Sunday, January 25:
Given the increasingly dire predictions for this week's storm, there is a distinct possibility that classes will be suspended for one or more days.
Class cancellation information will be posted here when available. It will also be on the college website, www.NCC.edu, and on the following:

KJOY 98.3 FM
WALK 97.5 FM
WALK 1370 AM
WBAB 102.3
WBLI 106.1 FM
WBZO 103.1 FM
WGSM 740 AM
WHLI AM
WRCM 103.9 FM
WHPC 90.3 FM
WORK 710 AM
WCBS 88 AM
NEWS 12 LI

Saturday, January 24:
Updated versions of both the main page and syllabus have been posted.
Several typographical errors and page numbers have been corrected.

In addition, links are being verified and updated as necessary; most links through March 2 on the schedule should be working now.
While every effort is made to verify the accuracy and usefulness of these links and their contents, no guarantees are made.
Please notify me of any broken or outdated links at
brian.murphy@ncc.edu.

Wednesday, January 7:
The main page and syllabus have both been updated for the Spring 2015 semester.
However, links have not yet been verified or corrected.

Textbooks have been ordered through the NCC Bookstore; however, you are encouraged to purchase them from wherever they are least expensive.
We will be using the following:

Greenblatt, Stephen, et. al., eds.  The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed.  Package 2.  New York: W. W. Norton, 2012 (Available used starting at $48.50 at Amazon.com)

Dickens, Charles.  Hard Times, ANY EDITION. (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com)

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Ed. Maurice Hindle. New York: Penguin, 2003. ISBN 978-0-141-43947-1 (Available used starting at $2.42 at Amazon.com***)

Note: Any editions of Hard Times and Frankenstein are acceptable for class. However, those editions of Frankenstein based on the 1818 text, not the 1831, are preferred by most contemporary scholars. In addition, English majors—or anyone considering pursuing further literary studies—should consider purchasing the Norton Critical Editions version of Hard Times and Frankenstein, which contain authoritative texts, historical backgrounds and contexts, and a selection of useful criticism.

 

 

 

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