ENG 100: Enhanced Composition I, Fall 2017
Section M1:  Monday 2:00–3:15 pm, G 309; Wednesday 2:00–3:15 pm and 3:30-4:20 pm, L 233-B (Lab)
CRN 17390

The Norton Field Guide to Writing, 4 ed.

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Wednesday, December 20
I have finished evaluating all of the research essay folders submitted; a few interesting details:

·         Of forty-one students enrolled this semester, eight officially withdrew, while another eight simply stopped attending and received grades of UW.

·         Instead of twenty-five folders, however, I received only twenty-two: three students simply did not submit a final research folder.

With only twenty-two folders to evaluate, I was able to go through them each several times. As I stated I would, I checked each for the following:

·         Formatting, including font, spacing, and cover page;

·         Documentation, including use of correct signal phrases, parenthetical citations, and the Works Cited page;

·         The thesis statements, which some students still have not learned to underline, which were supposed to be clear, assertive, and specific, following the model stressed all semester and including the subject about which you are arguing; the focus, your claim or assertion about the topic, and the major divisions of your essay;

·         All of the usual things: content, organization, grammar, diction, mechanics, and spelling.

Since research folders were worth fifteen percent of your final grade, they were evaluated and given points on all of the above, resulting in a scale of zero to fifteen. The lowest grade (exclusive of zeroes previously mentioned) was 5.11, an F; the highest was 15.0, an A.

Your final grades for the semester are posted at MyNCC (login required) and are also listed below by ID number. These grades contain generous scaling, including bonus points and adjustments. In addition, extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page. Therefore, do not email me to ask about extra credit or other things you can do to bring your average up since you were almost passing” or just one point away” from the A and so on; in reality, you were closer to five or six points away.

Research Essay folders may be picked up in the Spring 2018 semester, by appointment only. Enjoy the break.

2.5%

10%

10%

10%

10%

15%

15%

5%

5%

15%

1.00

 

 

Attendance/
Participation

Quizzes/ Exercises

In-Class Writing

Essay 1: Narration

Essay 2: Process

Midterm: C/C 

Essay 4: Argument

Research Bibliography 

Research Draft

Research Project

Final  Average

Earned Grade

N00776697

78.8

37.6

49.0

0

0

C–

0

0

0

0

17.26

UW

N00839479

80.0

50.8

62.1

0

0

C–

0

0

0

0

22.0

UW

N00841443

100.0

69.9

96.3

B

C

B

B+

5

5

A

98.9

A

N00859390

46.9

42.4

38.2

F

0

F

0

0

0

0

4.95

UW

N00860870

77.5

34.3

48.4

F

F

0

F

0

0

F

33.8

F

N00863535

80.0

57.9

54.6

C–/D

0

F

0

0

0

0

24.9

F

N00867711

91.9

36.9

52.4

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

W

N00868019

95.0

73.6

73.8

C–

C

C–

C+

5

0

B+

80.5

B

N00868915

92.5

51.9

72.8

0

F

F

C

4

5

C

62.0

D

N00871655

89.1

52.4

66.6

C–/D

0

C–

C–

0

5

C–

60.9

D

N00872808

95.0

68.3

97.1

B

F

B+

C+

4

5

C+

87.0

B+

N00875698

87.5

73.2

70.2

C–

0

C

C–/D

4

0

D

60.3

D

N00875888

21.1

2.5

11.9

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

W

N00875953

100.0

94.8

100.0

A–

B

B+

B+

4

5

A–

100.0

A

N00876047

54.4

1.3

33.4

0

0

C–

0

0

0

0

0.69

UW

N00876116

91.3

39.8

61.7

0

C

C–

C–

4

5

C+

64.5

D

N00876837

100.0

71.9

99.5

F

C+

C+

B+

4

5

A

94.2

A

N00877089

90.0

47.1

58.7

C–/D

0

C–

C–

3

5

C–

61.2

D

N00879491

57.9

28.2

45.7

0

0

B–

0

0

0

0

9.37

UW

N00879719

97.5

78.0

93.6

B+

B–

B+

A

5

5

A

97.4

A

 

 

 

Tuesday, December 12:
A final reminder:

On Wednesday, December 13, the Research Essay folders are due. We will not meet in class that day; instead, you must drop off your folder at my office in Bradley Hall, Room Y-16. I will be conducting faculty read-ins for ENG 001 classes; please leave your work in the box outside my office. The folder must include your Annotated Bibliography, Research Essay Draft, and copies of all sources used. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete research essay in a folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment, just as for any essay.

If you choose to revise the Argument Essay, that must also be dropped off at the same time; you may include it in your Research Essay folder. As always, revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay, and must be submitted with the original graded essay and all previous drafts attached, as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made. Only revisions received by 2:30 or earlier will be accepted.

Your final grades for the semester will be posted at MyNCC (login required) and will also be listed here by ID number; therefore, I will not reply to emails or phone calls inquiring about grades.

Friday, December 8:
On Monday, December 11, we will discuss your Research Essay Folders and Argument Essays, and I will answer any questions you may have. We will also preview the next step for most of you, ENG 102, including course expectations and requirements. Be sure to read “Literary Analysis” (Bullock 206-215) in preparation.

On Wednesday, December 13, the Final Research Essay Folder is due. We will not meet in class that day; instead, you must drop off your folder at my office in Bradley Hall, Room Y-16. The folder must include your Annotated Bibliography, Research Essay Draft, and copies of all sources used. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete research essay in a folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment, just as for any essay.

If you choose to revise the Argument Essay, that must also be dropped off at the same time. As always, revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay, and must be submitted with the original graded essay and all previous drafts attached, as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made. Only revisions received at the start of class next Wednesday or earlier will be accepted.

Wednesday, December 6:
Despite repeated reminders that the Research Essay Draft was due in class today, and that it is worth 5% of your final grade, only nine students came to class prepared. All nine received full credit for the draft, and also received credit for the workshop as an in-class writing assignment. Remember that the Final Research Essay Folder is due in one week, on Wednesday, December 13.

The Argument “Revision” was also read, graded, and returned today. If you neglected to pick it up, you may do so at my office tomorrow between 1:00 and 2:00 pm, or in class on Monday. You may revise this essay for a better grade; as always, revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay, and must be submitted with the original graded essay and all previous drafts attached, as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made. Only revisions received at the start of class next Wednesday or earlier will be accepted.

Wednesday, November 29:
As announced in class today, I have made revisions to the schedule for the last few weeks:

The Argument “Revision” is due on Monday; this is an essay of at least three to four (3-4) pages (750 to 1000 words, minimum) based on your earlier Argument “draft”; it is not a research essay. Expand each of your topic sentences into full, well-developed paragraphs, add a proper introduction and conclusion, and submit it with the original graded “draft” attached. Note: You do not have to include a one-page explanation of your revisions this time.

The Research Essay Draft is now due in class for revision and workshop on Wednesday, December 6, and the Final Research Essay Folder is due one week later, on Wednesday, December 13.

Sunday, November 26:
We now have only a few weeks left; be sure to stay on top of all readings and assignment due dates.

On Monday, the Annotated Bibliography is due. As discussed in class, this must include a minimum of five to seven sources correctly cited according to MLA style. Sources must be scholarly/professional criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com. Instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher, to locate appropriate sources.

In addition to a correct citation for each source, you must include a description or summary of the source, at least two to three sentences, and an explanation of how you foresee incorporating it into your essay. For additional information on Annotated Bibliographies, see the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)’s Annotated Bibliographies, as well as “Sample Annotated Bibliography” and Ebel, Kimberly, “Class and Gender in Cinderella: Annotated Bibliography.”

Wednesday, November 22:
Essay 4: Argument “Drafts” were due in class at 2:00 today. For those who did not submit it, I have recorded a zero. Everyone who did submit it on time will receive it back, with comments and corrections, when we return on Monday. Revisions (completed essays) will then be due one week later.

If you have not already completed it, remember that your Annotated Bibliography is also due when we return on Monday.

Enjoy the holiday.

Wednesday, November 15:
The additional recommended readings mentioned in class today:

·                     Jonathan Swift, “ A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland from Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to The Public
 

·                     Jessica Mitford, “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain

Sunday, November 12:
For Monday, November 13, remember that  revisions of Essay 2 (Process) and Essay 3 (Midterm/Compare-Contrast) are both due in class. Revisions must be at least three to four (3-4) pages (750 to 1000 words, minimum), typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins and the proper heading, and stapled when submitted. Just like all revisions, your submissions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

·         Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified.

·         Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why.

Your  homework from Wednesday is also due: Analyzing two sources, one from Google and one from Academic Search Complete, on one of the topics from last Monday's in-class writing.

Readings for tomorrow will be distributed in class: Sarah Childress, “Why States Are Changing Course on Juvenile Crime,” “ Solitary Cconfinement: Punishment or Cruelty?” and Eric Westervelt, “ Measuring the Power of a Prison Education.”

Tuesday, November 7:
I have posted two additional extra credit opportunities on the main page: Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops, Nov. 9–Dec. 5,  and The Public Theater's Mobile Unit presents Shakespeare: The Winter's Tale, Tuesday, November 14. In addition, remember that Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard will be speaking on campus Tuesday, November 14, at 10:00 am and 1:00 pm. As with all extra credit assignments, if you attend one or more of these events and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can receive additional points. The Laura Bates presentation and the free Shakespeare are each worth 2 points extra credit; the MLA workshops are worth a single point.

Remember that for Wednesday, you should read “Finding and Evaluating Sources” as well as “Documentation” and “MLA Style” (Bullock 445-472 and 496-548). There will be in-class writing and/or homework based on the readings.

For Monday, November 13, read the handouts (to be posted and distributed tomorrow). Also remember that  revisions of Essay 2 (Process) and Essay 3 (Midterm/Compare-Contrast) are both due in class on Monday.

Saturday, November 4:
Below are some of my favorites from the diction exercise, including several from previous semesters. I have not edited or revised any of these works; words including asterisks below were so written in the students' work. Also, note how many students begin their colloquial translations the same way.

     Colloquial:

     Pretentious:

Bruh! Guess what I did yesterday?
I sailed my shit, mad smoothly in the bay.
Word to everything it was lit!
Life is but a hallucination.

There was this hag who lived in some kicks.
She had so many brats, it left her mad confused;
She gave them some Ramen without any noodles;
She beat them crazy and called it a day.

Alright ima tell the rain to go away and come back some other day.
My little brother Johnny wants to go outside but it be raining.
Ima tell the rain to head to Spain and not to show his face again in my town ever.

So this sparkling shit be shining down on me like I'm in love with it. Bitch Im higher than a kite of course. imma be staring at chu..

Lil Miss Muffet went to go sit on some shit to eat real quick when some lil bum-ass spider wanna come and scare the shit out of this bitch.

Yo Mary had a little lamb, son,
His fur was mad white.
He was stuck up her behind
Everywhere she went he followed.
Mad annoying!

Yo, der wuz this gian egg that sat on this wall this giant egg busted its fxxxen a$$ the kings ridarz and his boys tried to fix that giant egg but he splatterd and broke so bad that he couldn’t be put back together again.

Yo, dere was 5 little piggies
One went to da market
Da otha one stayed home
The next one ate roast beef
He aint give the otha one any
And da last one cried like a b****h
All the way home.

Yo tell me why
Shorty up the block was sitting on her a**
Eating mad food and s***
And the big-a** roach came beside her
And Shorty was out.

Yo, come here son I gotta story to tell ya.
Yesterday my homeboy and his shorty Jill
Went up a mound to bring some drool back to the Hood,
The dude fell Bust his ass, and before I knew it,
His homegirl was eating rocks, just like he was.
But umm anyways, he got up and jetted to his mama's joint,
And all she did was put some alcohol on a bandanna and tied it to his dome.

Harold perched himself on high
Harold got knowcked the f*** down
All the head pimps hoes
And his manwhores too
Couldn't stack that s*** up how it was posed to be

Hey, diddle, diddle. A four legged creature that meows and a bowed string musical instrument in classical music. The black and white milk giving farm animal pushed itself off the surface of earth, into the air, then reached outer space to go over the astronomical body that orbits Earth. The wolf like canid showed lively amusement, to detect by this sight. And the circular piece of glass people eat off of, used the method of terrestrial locomotion with the small shallow bowl with a handle.

The miniscule Jack Horner engaged in a position in which his weight was solemnly supported by his buttocks rather than his feet with an upright back in the expanse of the room where two edges meet, positioning a Christmas pastry into the lower part of the human face that is surrounded by lips through which the food is taken in and speech is emitted, and consuming it. He emitted his short, first digit of the human hand, set lower apart from the other four, opposable to them, exerted the force by withholding a drupe fruit of the subgenus Prunus, and uttered the words to convey information with feeling, "What a greatly approved and desired young man am I!"

Utilize your oars to displace the fresh water that is bearing our vessel to engage in motion, in a relaxed and calming manner, down the tributary. Ecstatically, ecstatically, ecstatically! Our existence is nothing more than a series of images, sounds, and experiences initiated in the mind during the REM cycle of sleep.

As I gazed into the astronomical firmament, I became mesmerized by a brilliant luminary that enthralled my trentonomous sicoglicenerals. Thus was the initial luminary I fixated my ocular organs upon throughout these hours of darkness. I may perhaps anticipate for implementation.

An infinitesimal arachnid ascended a protrusive spigot that emanated a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Liquid precipitation descended, and the arachnid plummeted forthwith. The self-luminous celestial body, at the point equidistant between extremes in our solar system, emerged and desiccated the aforementioned precipitation. The arachnid embarked anew with its previous endeavor.

The miniscule vermin, of the family arachnid, ascended a hollow shaft associated with the deterrence of hydrogen bonded to oxygen that comprises a molecular structure in liquid state. Due to precipitation, the said arachnid was taxied downwards and came to an end in a perpendicularly state to the afore-mentioned shaft. Abruptly afterwards, the largest known star in the solar system directed its effect upon the residual precipitation and the above mentioned fauna reconvened its vertical ascension previously attempted.

The miniscule arachnid was violently flushed down the drain by severe meteorological conditions. After the storm system dissipated and the aqueous hydrogen dioxide evaporated into its gaseous state, the hapless arachnid somehow managed to escape its doom.

Propel your vessel down the rivulet, while joyfully examining existence.

As the daylight comes to a conclusion, the grand celestial bodies of twilight become apparent in the upper atmosphere. I covet the chance to be able to take into my possession the desired outcome I beseech from the blazing heavenly bodies above.

Oh, ball-shaped gaseous celestial body
That shines by its own light,
Incomparable solitary star on this night,
Allow myself to accomplish
My desire [and?] wishes on this day.

 

 

Friday, November 3:
Today was the last day of the mis-named "Automatic Withdrawal Period"; as of tomorrow, students must still obtain their instructor’s signature to withdraw a course, but are no longer assured of receiving it. Instructors have the option not to sign the withdraw form, so that students remain on the roster and receive a grade at the end of the semester. If you have stopped attending class, I will still sign withdrawal slips, but only if you bring a completed form to me next week at the start of the class period or during my office hours.

If you have stopped attending class and do not bring a completed form to me by the end of next week, you will receive a grade of UW (Unofficial Withdrawal) at the end of the semester, which carries the same weight as a grade of F. It will adversely affect your GPA, and potentially your financial aid and academic status as well.

Tuesday, October 31:
Remember that you must not only submit your essay in class, but  also upload it to TurnItIn.com. I added the folder for Essay 2: Process after class yesterday; so far only three students have uploaded their files, however.

For tomorrow, be sure to read Using Words Effectively: “Audience,” “Genre” (Bullock 57-63) and “Words” (Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4). There will be in-class writing assignments. In addition, the homework assigned on Monday is due,

Tuesday, October 24:
I have posted yet another opportunity for extra credit on the main page:

Student Life and the First Year Experience Committee present
Laura Bates, author of
Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard
Tuesday, November 14
CCB Multi-Purpose Room
10:00 am and 1:00 pm

As with all extra credit assignments, if you attend the lecture and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can receive additional points: this event and written response is worth 2 points extra credit. In addition, I have corrected the errors on dates for the Tuesday evening series of Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops.

Remember, tomorrow we will devote the entire period to the Midterm Exam.
Be sure to bring to class the
in-class compare-contrast assignment completed in lab last week.

Monday, October 16:
The revised class page has been reposted and should now display properly. Note the following:

The problem with the online exercises has been corrected. The old links have been corrected and now work as previously, including the submission of scores via Norton Gradebook. Your scores for Pronoun Review, Pronoun Agreement, Pronoun Reference, Pronoun Case; Verb Tenses, Verb Forms, Active and Passive, Mood are due by Monday, October 23, not by Wednesday as has been the case previously. Be sure to include your full, correct name, to use M1 for Section, and to use my correct email address to ensure I receive your scores correctly.

For Monday, the correct readings for Shakespeare Saved My Life are Chapters 16–23, 50, 61 (pages 63–93, 179–81, 223–226)

On Wednesday, October 18, the class will be devoted to in-class prewriting; the Midterm itself has been pushed back one week, to Wednesday, October 25.

Wednesday, October 10:
Updated 4:45 pm:
The problem with the online exercises has been corrected. The old links have been corrected and now work as previously, including the submission of scores via Norton Gradebook. Be sure to include your full, correct name, to use M1 for Section, and to use my correct email address to ensure I receive your scores correctly.

Today's in-class writing assignment is here; you also have a copy in your email, along with instructions for the day.

Also, as I have stated in class on multiple occasions, inappropriate use of phones or other electronic devices in class, including texting, is prohibited; students engaging in such activity are recorded as absent, as they are not “present, prepared, attentive, and active participants in the learning process” as required. Refer to your syllabus for classroom policies if you have questions.

Tuesday, October 10:
Although I was not in class on Monday (and will not be on Wednesday, either), Professor O'Connor was kind enough to proctor for me. All work you submit to her will be graded and returned, and attendance (based on the in-class assignments, quizzes, and/or attendance sheets) will also be counted.

As a reminder, revisions of Essay 1 are due in class on Wednesday, October 11; topic choices and instructions are here. Revisions instructions are here; incomplete submissions will not be read, nor will late submissions be accepted. As announced in class last week, if you did not submit a completed essay on time, you received a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” However, this one time, I will allow you to bring a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, review it with a tutor, and then revise it; you must include the tutor-reviewed essay, your revision, and the one-page explanation on Wednesday, as per the revision instructions.

Also on Wednesday, there will be another in-class writing assignment; you will be asked to prewrite, then type (and submit) at least one page of notes on a topic or topics to be assigned. Be sure to bring with you Shakespeare Saved My Life, “Saved” by Malcolm X, and any other handouts, as the assignment may ask you to draw upon them.

As announced in class, the second set of online exercises (S-V Agreement Review, S-V Separated, Compound Subjects, Subject after Verb, Collective Nouns, Indefinite Pronouns, Who, That, Which) was due by 2:00 pm on Wednesday, October 4; any scores submitted after that point will not be recorded. (Nor, as I said in class on September 27, will any scores recorded while the class was watching and discussing the Allegory of the Cave!) On Wednesday, after you have completed and handed in the in-class writing assignment, read “Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement,” “Pronoun Reference,” “Pronoun Case” (Norton S-6a-c) and “Verbs” (Norton S-4), and complete the third set of online exercises: Pronoun Review, Pronoun Agreement, Pronoun Reference, Pronoun Case; Verb Tenses, Verb Forms, Active and Passive, Mood.  Remember, you must complete the ten-question version of each exercise, and you should not submit scores lower than 70%. If your score is not 70% or better, close the exercise, reread the appropriate section in the Norton Online Handbook, and then try the exercises again. If you finish both the in-class assignment and all of the exercises, you may leave; otherwise, you are expected to stay for the entire class period. (That is, 4:00 if no break is taken.) If you do not finish the exercises on Wednesday, the remainder must be submitted by 2:00 the following Wednesday.

Friday, September 29:
Essay 1 was due in class on Wednesday, September 27; topic choices and instructions are here. As per the syllabus, if you do not submit a completed essay on time, you receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” However, this one time, I will allow you to bring a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, review it with a tutor, revise it, and submit that on the date revisions are due for at least partial credit. Details will be announced in class.

Finally, I would remind everyone to read the syllabus carefully: “Distracting or inappropriate behavior or unauthorized use of electronic devices is strictly prohibited. Eating, sleeping, texting, or other inappropriate behavior...will adversely affect your final grade.” As previously announced, inappropriate use of phones in class, including texting, is recorded as an absence for the day. More than three recorded absences results in a reduction of the final grade by one full letter grade for each additional recorded absence.

Monday, September 25:
Information about yet another set of extra credit assignments has been posted on the main page: Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops.

Thursday, 21 September:
As announced in class, the first set of online exercises (Identifying Fragments, Editing Fragments, Comma Splices and Fused Sentences, Editing Comma Splices and Fused Sentences) is due by the start of the next lab period. Any scores not received before 2:00 pm next Wednesday will not be recorded. Remember, you must complete the ten-question version of each exercise, and you should not submit scores lower than 70%. If your score is not 70% or better, close the exercise, complete the reading in the Norton Online Handbook (“Fragments” and “Comma Splices and Fused Sentences,” Norton S-2 and S-3), and then try the exercises again. To submit the exercise, remember you must complete the submission form completely and correctly before you click Send Quiz: include your full name, your email address, my correct email address, and M1 in the box for Section. Failure to complete the form exactly as instructed will result in your scores not being received or recorded.

Monday, 18 September:
As announced in class, the second set of extra credit assignments has been posted on the main page: Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each) presented by the NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling.

Sunday, 17 September:
For tomorrow, be sure to read “Narrating” (Bullock 419-427), as well as Shakespeare Saved My Life through Chapter 8 and the handouts distributed in class: Douglass, Learning to Read and Write” and Rich, “Claiming an Education.”

Tuesday, 12 September:
For tomorrow, be sure to read “Reading in Academic Contexts” (Bullock 10-32), “Analyzing Texts” (Bullock 94-128), and “Beginning and Ending” (Bullock 331-343), as well as the handout, Bragg, “All Over but the Shoutin’” (Bullock 216-220).

The projector problems in L 233-B have been corrected, so we will complete both the Diagnostic Essay and Entrance Survey, originally planned for last week.

And the typo on the syllabus stating that we meet in L 233-A, not -B, has been corrected and the new version has been uploaded.

Finally, as a reminder, class meets in G building, Room 309. This information is on your syllabus, and was one of the first things I wrote on the board last week, so you should have this information in your notebooks.

Thursday, 6 September:
As announced in class yesterday, the first extra credit assignment has already been posted:

Blackboard Training for Students (1 point)
The Office of Distance Education will be offering on-campus demonstrations for students during the first two weeks of classes this fall, and we are asking you to encourage students to attend so that they can familiarize themselves with Blackboard in order to make their transition to college more manageable.

All sessions take place in G building, Room 149.
No advance registration needed; first come, first served basis.

 Tuesday, September 5

 11:30 am–12:45 pm

 Wednesday, September 6

 3:30 pm–4:45 pm

 Thursday, September 7

 11:30 am–12:45 pm

 Friday, September 8

 9:30 am–10:45 am

 Monday, September 11

 2:00 pm–3:15 pm

 Tuesday, September 12

 5:30 pm–6:50 pm

 Wednesday, September 13

 2:00 pm–3:15 pm

 Thursday, September 14

 11:30 am–12:45 pm

 Friday, September 15

 11:00 am–12:15 pm

If students attend and provide evidence of their attendance (handouts will be available, and you should also have the opportunity to sign in) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive one additional point, added to their current average. Note: you may not attend the workshop two or more times for additional extra credit.

I have also been in contact with the English Department's technician, and the AV department has resolved the problem with the projector in L 233-B. It should be working next Wednesday. Assuming it is, we will—among other things—complete the online intake survey for ENG 100, as well as the diagnostic essay.

Tuesday, August 29:
The main page and syllabus have been updated for the Fall 2017 semester.

Classes begin on Friday, September 1; as Monday, September 4 is a holiday, our first meeting is on Wednesday, September 6.
Class will start promptly at 2:00 in L 233-B. (A. Holly Patterson Library Building, second floor)

The class page for Fall 2016, the last time I taught this class, is located here.
If you are looking for class announcements from Fall 2016, they are here.

 

 

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