ENG 100: Enhanced Composition I, Fall 2018
Section G3:  Monday 11:00 am–12:15 pm, S 101 and 12:15–1:20 pm, L 233-B (Lab);
                    Wednesday 11:00 am–12:15 pm, Y 04
CRN 17869
The Norton Field Guide to Writing, 4 ed.

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Wednesday, December 21:
I have finished evaluating all of the research essay folders submitted on time and have calculated final grades. Grades for the semester are posted at MyNCC (login required) and are also listed below by ID number. These grades contain generous scaling, including bonus points and adjustments. In addition, extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page. Therefore, do not email me to ask about “extra credit” or other things you can do to bring your average up since you were “almost passing” or “just one point away” from the A and so on; in reality, you were probably closer to five or six points away.

 

Student ID

Attendance

Quizzes/ Exercises

In-Class Writing

Essay 1: Narration

Essay 2: Process

Midterm: C/C

Essay 4: Argument

Research Bibliography

Research Draft

Research Folder

Final  Average

Earned Grade

N00715690

94.7

68.3

81.5

C

B–

C

B

5

5.0

B+

85.00

B+

N00812561

45.9

39.8

28.1

B+

F

C

0

0

0

0

25.60

UW

N00828416

1.9

0.0

0.0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

W

N00842014

85.9

52.1

43.5

0

0

F

B–

0

5.0

F

45.53

F

N00875462

12.2

0.0

27.5

0

0

0

0

0

0.0

0

0.00

UW

N00881398

93.6

46.1

77.5

F

0

C–

F

3

0

F

55.79

F

N00883715

81.4

31.6

66.2

0

B–

C

C–/D

4

5.0

B–

68.48

C

N00884744

100.0

89.7

91.9

A–

B

B+

B

5

5.0

A

98.11

A

N00885586

84.6

56.5

64.9

C

C–

F

F

3

0

F

56.00

F

N00887159

64.1

35.7

53.0

B–

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

W

N00887281

82.1

50.8

68.9

C+

0

C+

C

0

0

F

58.00

D

N00887321

94.9

48.8

71.4

A–

A–

C+

C+

3

0

B+

84.54

B+

N00887482

91.4

53.4

74.1

B

C

B–

B–

4

5.0

B

80.81

B

N00890861

94.1

74.6

71.4

B–

F

B

A–

4

5.0

A

85.88

B+

N00892135

76.9

48.5

63.2

B

F

F

C–/D

3

5.0

F

59.70

D+

N00892468

94.9

82.0

96.2

C+

B–

C+

B+

5

5.0

B

88.11

B+

N00894152

66.7

63.1

56.4

C+

F

F

D

3

5.0

F

53.73

D

N00894703

84.6

36.3

51.9

C

C

C+

C–

4

0

F

66.60

C

N00896171

23.1

22.5

16.8

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.00

UW

N00896546

100.0

99.2

100.0

A

A

B+

A

5

5.0

A–

100.00

A

N00896630

94.9

39.5

52.5

0

0

F

0

0

5.0

D–

38.27

F

Research Essay folders or other work may be picked up in the Spring 2019 semester, by appointment only. Enjoy the break.

 

 

Monday, December 17:
Despite repeated reminders, emails, and class announcements that research essay folders must include photocopies or printouts of all sources, with the relevant passages highlighted or underlined, five students chose to submit folders without a single source printed. As a result, they have failed the assignment. Since the project is worth 15% of the final grade, this essentially guarantees that all five will fail the class this semester.

Your final grades for the semester will be posted at MyNCC (login required) and will also be listed here by ID number; therefore, I will not reply to emails or phone calls inquiring about grades.

Sunday, December 16:
Just a reminder: your final research paper projects are due at 11:00
am tomorrow.

The research paper must be at least five to seven pages (1250-1500 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the five- to seven-page requirement).

It must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement, and should be on the opposing side of the argument essay you submitted. That is, if you argued for stricter gun control laws, you must now argue against them; if you argued that Amazon’s new headquarters would be bad for Long Island City, you must now prove it will benefit the neighborhood and the city. This is designed to get you to engage with both sides of a debate, as well as to develop your skills in finding and evaluating sources and in writing an argument and refuting opposing viewpoints.

You must use a minimum of three to five secondary sources; secondary sources must be scholarly/professional criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com. Instead, use the library resources, including the library databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher, to locate appropriate sources. You must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented  and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly.

The final research paper must be submitted in a research folder, including your Preliminary Draft, Annotated Bibliography, Argument (all versions),  and copies of all sources used. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete research essay in a folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment, just as for any essay, and therefore likely failure for the course as well.

I will be accepting completed folders in the regular classroom, South 101, at 11:00 am. If you are late, your essay will be penalized 10%, as per class policy; refer to the policy on late work on your syllabus. If it is not submitted tomorrow or is not complete, it will receive a grade of zero (0).

Tuesday, December 11:
Note the following clarifications on  the
schedule:

Wed. 12 Dec

  Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

  Class meets in regular classroom for drop-off/pick-up/checking of grades only.

Mon. 17 Dec

  Evening classes meet on a Wednesday schedule

  Research Essay Folder Due (Final)
 
Class meets in regular classroom for drop-off only.
  Lab session does not meet,

Wed. 19 Dec

  Final Conferences (by appointment only): Y-16
  Day & Distance Education classes end

These are not changes, just elaborations on what has been already posted and announced.

Tuesday, December 4:
I have adjusted the
schedule as per our class discussion yesterday. Research drafts are now due next Monday, December 10, and final research folders will be due the following Monday, on December 17.

The final exercises are also due next week. Under November 5, the following required exercises are listed, and should be completed before Monday, December 10.

Appropriate Words - 1, Appropriate Words - 2, Precise Words

Commonly Confused Words - 1, Commonly Confused Words - 2, Commonly Confused Words - 3

Empty Words and Expletives, Wordy Phrases and Redundancies

Under Wednesday, December 5, I have added “Punctuation” and “Mechanics” (Norton P-1 through P-11) to the readings and posted the following exercises to complete before Wednesday, December 12.:

Commas: Review, Semicolon: Review, End Punctuation: Review;

Quotation Marks: Review, Apostrophes: Review, Capitalization: Review, Italics: Review

All other exercises listed on these dates are optional and will not be included in determining your final grad

 

Wednesday, November 28:
For Monday, December 3, be sure to read Shankar, “
The Case of the Missing Kidney: An Analysis of Rumor” (Handout). Also, be sure you have read and understand instructions for the research essay, as this is due in class on Wednesday, December 5.

I hope to return both Essay 4 (Argument) “Revisions” and Annotated Bibliographies on Monday.

Finally, I have posted the missing online exercises on the main page. Under November 5, I have posted the following required exercises:

Appropriate Words - 1, Appropriate Words - 2, Precise Words

Commonly Confused Words - 1, Commonly Confused Words - 2, Commonly Confused Words - 3

Empty Words and Expletives, Wordy Phrases and Redundancies

You should complete these exercises before Monday, December 10. The other exercises listed on this date are optional.

Under Wednesday, December 5, I have added “Punctuation” and “Mechanics” (Norton P-1 through P-11) to the readings and posted the following exercises:

Commas: Review, Semicolon: Review, End Punctuation: Review;

Quotation Marks: Review, Apostrophes: Review, Capitalization: Review, Italics: Review

You should complete these exercises before Wednesday, December 12.

Tuesday, 27 November:
On Wednesday, November 28,  we are meeting in CCB MPR to hear
David Hogg, Parkland High School shooting survivor and co-founder of March for Our Lives. Attendance is not optional; if you choose not to attend or do not sign in with me, you will be marked absent and receive a zero for the day.

In addition, Essay 4 (Argument) “Revisions” and Annotated Bibliographies are both due; you must have these documents printed out to hand in to me at the event, as I will not accept them later or via email. Finally, I will have copies of the final instructions for the research essay for you to pick up.

Sunday, 25 November:
As a reminder, be sure to read “
Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing” and “Acknowledging Sources, Avoiding Plagiarism” (Bullock 478-495) for Monday’s class. You should also review the handout, How to Incorporate Sources. There will be an in-class writing assignment to complete in the lab.

On Wednesday, November 28,  Essay 4 (Argument) “Revisions” and Annotated Bibliographies are both due. We are meeting in CCB MPR, so you must have these documents printed out to hand in.

Wednesday, 21 November:
Note the following revisions to the schedule:

Essay 4 (Argument) “Revisions” and Annotated Bibliographies are both due on Wednesday, Nov. 28. We are meeting in CCB MPR, so you must have these documents printed out to hand in.

 On Wednesday, December 5, you must have a complete version of your Research Essay (Draft)  in class for peer review and workshopping.

The Research Essay Folder (Final), with all materials, must be submitted on Wednesday, December 12.

Thu.-Sun.
23-26  Nov

 Thanksgiving Break – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Mon. 26 Nov

 Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing,” “Acknowledging Sources, Avoiding Plagiarism” (Bullock 478-495)

 *See also,  How to Incorporate Sources (MS Word document)
  
 Practice incorporating sources into your work

Wed. 28 Nov

  Class will meet in CCB Multipurpose Room to hear David Hogg, Parkland High School shooting survivor and co-founder of March for Our Lives

  Essay 4 Due: Argument (“Revision”),
 
Annotated Bibliography Due

Mon. 3 Dec

  Model Research Essay: Shankar, “The Case of the Missing Kidney: An Analysis of Rumor” (Handout) 

Wed. 5 Dec

  Segal, “The Dog Ate My Flashdrive, and Other Tales of Woe” (Handout)

  Research Essay Due (Draft): Peer Review/Research Essay “Workshop

Mon. 10 Dec

  Literary Analysis” (Bullock 206-215);  ENG 102: Introduction/Advising

Wed. 12 Dec

  Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

  Research Essay Folder Due (Final)

Mon. 17 Dec

  Evening classes meet on a Wednesday schedule

  Conferences (by appointment only), Y-16

Wed. 19 Dec

  Final Conferences: Y-16
  Day & Distance Education classes end

 

Tuesday, 20 November:
I will return your Argument “Draft” on Wednesday, along with the in-class assignment completed in the lab yesterday. We will also have at least a quiz on the readings for the day, Borchers’sAgainst the Odds: Harry S Truman and the Election of 1948” (Bullock 540-548) and Harba’sWhat’s for Dinner? Personal Choices vs. Public Health” (Handout) and maybe talk about your current averages again.

Friday, 16 November:
Remember that your Argument “Draft” is due on Monday. This is a formal, final persuasive thesis statement and at least three to five topic sentences for the body of your argument. Your thesis should be argumentative (making a claim), rather than purely informative. Be sure to include in your topic sentences appropriate evidence, examples, data, or other support for your assertion; remember, however, that these are not research essays. As always, your “draft” should be correctly formatted and correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, and spelling. In addition, you should have an appropriate title, one more creative or original than “Argument Essay,” and underline your thesis. Your submission must be typed, 12-point Times new Roman, double-spaced, and adhere to the following format:

Thesis statement: A formal, specific, clear, and assertive statement on the actual debate or issue, adopting one side or favoring a single proposal.
It must include your topic, the claim or assertion, and the major divisions of your essay.

Topic sentence 1: The first major point or argument in favor of your claim.

Topic sentence 2: The second point supporting your argument.

And so on.

We will also discuss your analyses of the web pages, Australian Drop Bear,DHMO.org, and “Help Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus.

And be sure to complete the reading, Leonard, “Black Friday: Consumerism Minus Civilization” (Bullock 164-168)

Finally, below are some of my favorites from the diction exercise (homework), including some from previous semesters. I have not edited or revised any of these works; words including asterisks below were so written in the students' work. Also, note how many students begin their colloquial translations the same way.

     Colloquial:

     Pretentious:

Bruh! Guess what I did yesterday?
I sailed my shit, mad smoothly in the bay.
Word to everything it was lit!
Life is but a hallucination.

There was this hag who lived in some kicks.
She had so many brats, it left her mad confused;
She gave them some Ramen without any noodles;
She beat them crazy and called it a day.

Alright ima tell the rain to go away and come back some other day.
My little brother Johnny wants to go outside but it be raining.
Ima tell the rain to head to Spain and not to show his face again in my town ever.

So this sparkling shit be shining down on me like I'm in love with it. Bitch Im higher than a kite of course. imma be staring at chu..

Lil Miss Muffet went to go sit on some shit to eat real quick when some lil bum-ass spider wanna come and scare the shit out of this bitch.

Yo Mary had a little lamb, son,
His fur was mad white.
He was stuck up her behind
Everywhere she went he followed.
Mad annoying!

Yo, der wuz this gian egg that sat on this wall this giant egg busted its fxxxen a$$ the kings ridarz and his boys tried to fix that giant egg but he splatterd and broke so bad that he couldn’t be put back together again.

Yo, dere was 5 little piggies
One went to da market
Da otha one stayed home
The next one ate roast beef
He aint give the otha one any
And da last one cried like a b****h
All the way home.

Yo tell me why
Shorty up the block was sitting on her a**
Eating mad food and s***
And the big-a** roach came beside her
And Shorty was out.

Yo, come here son I gotta story to tell ya.
Yesterday my homeboy and his shorty Jill
Went up a mound to bring some drool back to the Hood,
The dude fell Bust his ass, and before I knew it,
His homegirl was eating rocks, just like he was.
But umm anyways, he got up and jetted to his mama's joint,
And all she did was put some alcohol on a bandanna and tied it to his dome.

Harold perched himself on high
Harold got knowcked the f*** down
All the head pimps hoes
And his manwhores too
Couldn't stack that s*** up how it was posed to be

A flash of light that shines brightly and then less brightly little ball of burning gas in space that is usually seen from earth as a point of light in the sky at night how I have the desire to know what you are Up above the earth together with its countries people and natural features extremely sky scraping in the matter of a precious stone consisting of a clear and typically colorless crystalline form of pure carbon the hardest naturally occurring substance in the region of the atmosphere and outer space seen from the earth A flash of light that shines brightly and then less brightly little ball of burning gas in space that is usually seen from earth as a point of light in the sky at night how I have the desire to know what you are

Hey, diddle, diddle. A four legged creature that meows and a bowed string musical instrument in classical music. The black and white milk giving farm animal pushed itself off the surface of earth, into the air, then reached outer space to go over the astronomical body that orbits Earth. The wolf like canid showed lively amusement, to detect by this sight. And the circular piece of glass people eat off of, used the method of terrestrial locomotion with the small shallow bowl with a handle.

The miniscule Jack Horner engaged in a position in which his weight was solemnly supported by his buttocks rather than his feet with an upright back in the expanse of the room where two edges meet, positioning a Christmas pastry into the lower part of the human face that is surrounded by lips through which the food is taken in and speech is emitted, and consuming it. He emitted his short, first digit of the human hand, set lower apart from the other four, opposable to them, exerted the force by withholding a drupe fruit of the subgenus Prunus, and uttered the words to convey information with feeling, "What a greatly approved and desired young man am I!"

Utilize your oars to displace the fresh water that is bearing our vessel to engage in motion, in a relaxed and calming manner, down the tributary. Ecstatically, ecstatically, ecstatically! Our existence is nothing more than a series of images, sounds, and experiences initiated in the mind during the REM cycle of sleep.

As I gazed into the astronomical firmament, I became mesmerized by a brilliant luminary that enthralled my trentonomous sicoglicenerals. Thus was the initial luminary I fixated my ocular organs upon throughout these hours of darkness. I may perhaps anticipate for implementation.

An infinitesimal arachnid ascended a protrusive spigot that emanated a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Liquid precipitation descended, and the arachnid plummeted forthwith. The self-luminous celestial body, at the point equidistant between extremes in our solar system, emerged and desiccated the aforementioned precipitation. The arachnid embarked anew with its previous endeavor.

The miniscule vermin, of the family arachnid, ascended a hollow shaft associated with the deterrence of hydrogen bonded to oxygen that comprises a molecular structure in liquid state. Due to precipitation, the said arachnid was taxied downwards and came to an end in a perpendicularly state to the afore-mentioned shaft. Abruptly afterwards, the largest known star in the solar system directed its effect upon the residual precipitation and the above mentioned fauna reconvened its vertical ascension previously attempted.

The miniscule arachnid was violently flushed down the drain by severe meteorological conditions. After the storm system dissipated and the aqueous hydrogen dioxide evaporated into its gaseous state, the hapless arachnid somehow managed to escape its doom.

Propel your vessel down the rivulet, while joyfully examining existence.

As the daylight comes to a conclusion, the grand celestial bodies of twilight become apparent in the upper atmosphere. I covet the chance to be able to take into my possession the desired outcome I beseech from the blazing heavenly bodies above.

Oh, ball-shaped gaseous celestial body
That shines by its own light,
Incomparable solitary star on this night,
Allow myself to accomplish
My desire [and?] wishes on this day.

 

Tuesday, 13 November:
As per the syllabus and as announced in class on Monday, the reading for tomorrow is Organ Sales Save Lives” by Joanna MacKay (Bullock 156-161).
Jonathan Swift’s “
A Modest Proposal” and Jessica Mitford’s “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain” are recommended additional readings, not required.

The homework assigned on Monday is also due tomorrow: one paragraph evaluating each of the three sites:

Australian Drop BearAustralianMuseum.net.au (https://australianmuseum.net.au/drop-bear)

DHMO.org (http://dhmo.org/)

Help Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus” (https://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/)

Just as is the rule with all work completed outside of the classroom, your submission must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. It must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; and avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, as is the case with all work, it should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation.

Monday, 12 November:
I have posted information about one more Extra Credit opportunity on the main page: Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops (1 point)

Sunday, 10 November
For Monday, complete the assigned reading:  “Finding and Evaluating Sources” (Bullock 445-472) and “Documentation” and “MLA Style” (Bullock 496-548); there will be a five-minute quiz to start the class before we review the material in class, and then an in-class assignment in the lab.

A few reminders about due dates:
The homework on logical fallacies was due on Monday November 5, and should have been handed in before you left the library.
The
in-class writing we were working on in the lab on Monday should have been completed at home and emailed to me (as an attachment) by last Wednesday
The
homework on diction (nursery rhyme assignment) is due in class on Monday, Nov. 12, as are Midterm Essay Revisions. Midterm Essay revisions must be at least three to four (3-4) pages (750 to 1000 words, minimum), typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins and the proper heading, and stapled when submitted, just like all essays completed at home. You must also submit the original bluebook or typed essay and  the prewriting. Incomplete or late revision submissions will not be read, nor will the original grade received be changed.

Monday, 5 November:
Due to today’s unexpected closing of the library, we must change the assignments. The homework due today, on logical fallacies, should have been handed in before you left, along with optional revisions of Essay 2 (Process) returned last week. The homework I assigned in the classroom, on diction, is due in class on Monday, Nov. 12. The in-class writing we were working on in the lab should be completed at home and emailed to me (as an attachment), by Wednesday at the latest.

Remember that we will not meet in Bradley Hall on Wednesday. As announced and posted, on Wednesday, November 7, we will meet in CCB MPR to hear Imbolo Mbue, author of Behold the Dreamers. You must see me and sign in to be marked present and to get credit for the day.

Tuesday, 30 October:
As announced in class yesterday, I am revising the schedule (again); see below. For tomorrow, read what you should have read for Monday: “Arguing” (Bullock 355-375), “Arguing a Position” (Bullock 156-182), and “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5). I will go over the logical fallacies assignment with you, and it will be due next Monday.

Also on Monday, I will return your Midterm Essays, and your revised Process essays (Essay 2) are due.

Revised schedule:

Wed. 31 Oct

 Persuasion/Argument Writing:
 “Arguing” (
Bullock 355-375), “Arguing a Position“ (Bullock 156-182)

 “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5)

 Online Exercises:

Adjectives and Adverbs - 1, Adjectives and Adverbs - 2, Modifier Placement

Fri. 2 Nov

 Last day automatic W full semester classes

Mon. 5 Nov

  Essay 2 (Process) Final Revisions Due

 Using Words Effectively: “Audience,” “Genre” (Bullock 57-63);
 “Words” (
Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4)

 Homework due: Logical fallacies

 In-class Writing (TBA)

 *See also,  Orwell,  “Politics and the English Language
                   Schuman, Rebecca. “
Cease Rogeting Proximately!Slate.com  14 Aug. 2014. Web.
                   Shea, Ammon. “
Vocabulary Size.” New York Times Magazine 14 March 2010: 14. New York Times. Web

Wed. 7 Nov

  Class will meet in CCB MPR to hear Imbolo Mbue, author of Behold the Dreamers.

Saturday, 27 October:
Last Monday, October 22, Essay 2 (Process) “Revisions” were due; as explained, this was not an optional assignment, but a required essay. Of the twenty students registered for the class, thirteen submitted the work. Wednesday, October 24, was the Midterm Essay. We will talk about both on Monday.

Also for Monday, be sure to read “Arguing” (Bullock 355-375) and “Arguing a Position” (Bullock 156-182), including Joanna MacKay’s, Nicholas Kristoff’s, and Andrew Leonard’s essays.  There will be a quiz.

Sunday, 21 October:
Remember that Essay 2 (Process) “Revisions” are due tomorrow; see below. In addition, I have changed the scheduled readings for tomorrow: you should read Neat People vs. Sloppy People” by Suzanne Britt (handout) and “Taking Essay Exams” (Bullock 428-432). There will likely be a quiz.

 Tuesday, 16 October:
As announced in class on Monday, Essay 2 (Process) “Revisions” are due Monday, October 22. To be clear, your assignment is to use either the prewriting completed in class on Wednesday, October 3 and Monday, October 8, or the in-class writing assignment from Wednesday, October 10. Your submission must be a finished, typed essay of at least three to four (3-4) pages (750 to 1000 words, minimum) with the original in-class work attached. Unlike other revisions, however, you do not have to include a one-page typed explanation of the changes you have made. You should of course work to improve content, organization, and diction, mechanics, and spelling.

Again, your essay is an expansion and revision of either one of these three topics:

1.)  How to become an A student, an athlete, or some other campus “type.”  Consider the various types or cliques with which you are familiar, determine what makes one group unique or special, and explain to your reader how to become a member of that group.

2.)  How to fit in in a particular context, such as going to film school, hanging out at a shopping mall, watching a football game, and so on. Explain the process to a newcomer who wishes to fit in as quickly as possible, and use examples to illustrate the steps in the process.

3.)  How to become an American. This should not be a literal explanation of the process of becoming a U.S. citizen; rather, it is an opportunity to explain how to adhere to specific cultural mores or stereotypes. This can be either flattering, emphasizing the positive qualities of being an American, or an ironic critique of some aspect(s) of American culture.

Or a directive essay, explaining how to master one specific important academic survival skill not mentioned by Brian O’Keeney in the handout, “How to Make It in College, Now that You’re Here: taking notes, finding materials in the college library, registering for classes, and so on.

For tomorrow, be sure to read (or preview)   “Documentation” and “MLA Style” (Bullock 496-548); we will discuss incorporating sources so that you may integrate at least one short quotation into your revised essay.

Finally, we will discuss prewriting for your midterm essay, which will be on Wednesday, October 24. If you are planning to request additional time or an alternate location, you should plan to do so tomorrow!

Sunday, 14 October:
For Monday, be sure to read “Comparing and Contrasting” (Bullock 380-387). You should also spend some time thinking about Batman and Superman.

Tuesday, 9 October:
On Wednesday, we will discuss the second handout distributed last week, Brian O’Keeney’sHow to Make It in College, Now that You’re Here.” There will be an in-class writing assignment. In addition, Essay 1 (Narrative/Descriptive) revisions are due. RFD/IOTS!

Friday, 5 October:
For Monday, be sure to read the handout distributed last week, Adam Goodheart’s “How to Mummify a Pharaoh.” There will be a quiz and/or in-class writing assignment.

Tuesday, 2 October:
As I said in class yesterday, you will be writing in class on Wednesday: you will be working on Essay 2 and/or revisions of Essay 1, which you will get back. For Essay 2, you must submit at the end of class one full page of prewriting (brainstorming, freewriting, outlining, mapping/clustering); this may be handwritten, legibly, or typed and printed. Along with this, you must submit a preliminary thesis and three to five (3-5) topic sentences on one of the assigned topics. (See handout.) Your submission must take the following form:

Thesis:  Your assertion concerning the process being explained, indicating the importance or benefit of the process, and the major steps necessary to complete the process.

  For example:  Although [process] may seem intimidating to the beginner, one can save time and money by [step 1], [step 2], and [step 3].

 

Topic sentence 1:  A sentence utilizing an appropriate chronological transition (time marker), indicating the first major step (your first major division), and emphasizing the main idea from your thesis (the process and its importance, ease, interest, or value).

For example:  The first step in [process] is to [name and define Step 1].

 

Topic sentence 2:  A sentence utilizing an appropriate chronological transition, indicating the next major step, and emphasizing the main idea from your thesis.

For example:  Next, to [process], be sure to [Step 2]

 

Topic sentence 3:  A sentence with an appropriate transition, indicating what the step is, et cetera.

For example:  After that, [Step 3].

 

Topic sentence 4 (if necessary): and so on. 

Note: Do not simply slavishly copy the example; write your own thesis and topic sentences!

In addition, if you have finished this prewriting “draft,” use the rest of the time to work on your revisions of Essay 1. Remember, All failing essays may be revised and resubmitted by the due dates announced when the graded essays are returned. For Essay 1, the due date is Wednesday, October 10. Essays receiving a passing grade may also be revised and resubmitted, but only after the student has met with the instructor during office hours (by appointment only) to discuss revisions. Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

·         Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified.

·         Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why.

·         Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction.

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, or if you submit a plagiarized essay, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.”

Saturday, 29 September:
One more last-minute Extra Credit opportunity has been added to the main page:

Women and Gender Studies and the Philosophy Department present
Kate Manne, author of
Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny
to speak about “Himpathy
(See “
Brett Kavanaugh and America’s ‘Himpathy’ Reckoning.” New York Times 26 Sep. 20018.)
Tuesday, October 2, at 1:00
CCB 252 

While not directly connected to our class readings and discussions, Ms. Manne’s presentation should be worth attending, so I will award extra credit to those attending.

Friday, 28 September:
I have posted information about two more Extra Credit opportunities on the main page: Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops and Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops. Each individual workshop is worth one point, if you attend and provide evidence of attendance along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera). While you may attend more than one workshop, you may not attend the same  workshop more than once for additional credit!

Tuesday, 25 September:
Your Introductions and Conclusions assignment was due in class Monday. As per my instructions after the evaluation, if you had not submitted it you had the rest of the day to email it. In addition, you should have finished the online exercises assigned last week; I have recorded scores for all exercises submitted before the end of the day on Monday.

We will also discuss Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” and will likely again start with a quiz, so be sure to read it carefully. Result from the last simple quiz suggest that some students had not bothered to look at the handout. I am almost certain to ask you to explain who Glaucon is and to define “allegory”….

Finally, note that Essay 1 is due tomorrow at the start of class, not after class and certainly not emailed to me. Essays must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. All essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and (unless otherwise indicated) avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation.

Sunday, 23 September:
As announced last week, the Introductions and Conclusions assignment is due in class Monday. You also should finish the online exercises by Monday: Identifying Fragments was to be completed in class last week, and  Editing Fragments, Comma Splices and Fused Sentences, and Editing Comma Splices and Fused Sentences are also required; Sentence Elements, Clauses, and Phrases are Optional.

We will also discuss “Claiming an Education” by Adrienne Rich and will likely start class with a quiz, so be sure to read it carefully.

Tuesday, 18 September:
Please make note of the changes announced in class today:

Mon. 17 Sep

 Narrative/Descriptive Writing:
 “Narrating” (Bullock 419-427); “Describing” and “Writing a Literacy Narrative“ (Bullock 399-407, 73-93);

 Douglass, “Learning to Read and Write” (Handout)

 General lab introduction, Norton Online Handbook,  TurnItIn.com;
 In-class work: Introductions and Conclusions

*See also,  Parker-Pope, Tara. “Valuable Lessons in Learning.” New York Times 7 Oct. 2014: D4.  (published online as “Better Ways to Learn.”
                     Abraham Lincoln on the Internet

Tue. 18 Sep

 Day classes meet on a Monday schedule
 Evening classes do not meet (classes beginning AFTER 5:01 PM)

 “Reading in Academic Contexts” (Bullock 10-32), “Analyzing Texts“ (Bullock 94-128); “Beginning and Ending“ (Bullock 331-343)
 “Fragments” (Norton S-2), “Comma Splices and Fused Sentences” (Norton S-3);
 Rich, “Claiming an Education” (Handout)

 Online Exercises:

Required: Identifying Fragments (to be completed in class), Homework: Editing Fragments, Comma Splices and Fused Sentences, Editing Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

*Optional: Sentence Elements, Clauses, Phrases

 Note: Do not attempt online exercises or the in-class work until we have discussed both assignments in class.

Wed. 19 Sep

 Yom Kippur – classes do not meet; COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Mon. 24 Sep

 Last day drop full semester classes without a W grade
 Rich, “Claiming an Education(Handout)
 Homework Due: Introductions and Conclusions

 Note: Scores from online exercises assigned as homework on Tuesday, 18 September must be received before today’s class.

The main page and syllabus have been updated to reflect these changes.

There will likely be a short quiz to begin the class, based on the readings.

 

Friday, 14 September:
I have posted information about an Extra Credit opportunity on the main page, at The Morgan Library and Museum:


College Night 2018–Monster Masquerade

The Morgan Library and Museum

Thursday, October 18, 2018, 6–8 pm
Free for students with valid ID.
Online reservation required: RSVP

If students attend one or more Extra Credit events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is worth 2 points extra credit unless otherwise noted.

Friday, September 7:
I have posted a revised and corrected
syllabus; please read the following before next Wednesday:

“Writing in Academic Contexts,”  “Rhetorical Situations“ (Bullock 1-9, 55-70); “Generating Ideas and Text,” “Drafting“ (Bullock 289-300), and

“Reading in Academic Contexts” (Bullock 10-32), “Analyzing Texts“ (Bullock 94-128); “Beginning and Ending“ (Bullock 331-343)

If you are unable to obtain a copy of the book in time, you will not be penalized, as there will not be a quiz. (There will be an in-class writing assignment or tow, however.) Bbe sure to read the assigned material as soon as you able.

If you were not in class on Wednesday, download and print out a copy of the syllabus. Once you have read and familiarized yourself with it, detach and complete the last page to be submitted in class next week.

Finally, I am looking for a volunteer who is willing to share his or her class notes. This is an unpaid, voluntary position; I cannot offer official extra credit, but your contribution will be looked on favorably. Please email me if you are interested.

Tuesday, September 6:
The main page and syllabus have been updated for the start of the Fall 2018 semester.

Classes begin on Tuesday, September 4; our first meeting is on Wednesday, September 5.
Class will start promptly at 11:00 in Y 04 (Bradley Hall, first floor)

The class page for Fall 2017, the last time I taught this class, is located here.
If you are looking for class announcements from Fall 2017, they are here.

 

 

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