ENG 001: Preparatory English
Section BB: Monday/Wednesday, 8:00 am–9:15 am
                      
North 112 
Steps for Writers: Sentences and Paragraphs to the Essay, vol. 1, 2 ed.

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16 (Placement Office)
516-572-7185, ext. 25686

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Monday, April 24:
For Wednesday, be sure to read
 “Writing Under Pressure: Facing Writing Examinations” (Eggers 163–165), and bring your textbook with you to class.
We will continue to prepare for the in-class final exam.

Next Monday, May 1, we will have a portfolio review: your complete portfolios must be brought to class.
In addition, we will have an in-class practice exit exam; be prepared to write a timed essay.

 

Tuesday, April 18:
As the semester is rapidly coming to a close, tomorrow we will discuss some important details: the final exam, portfolio requirements, and the schedule for the remaining weeks.

Tuesday, April 11:
Although we are on break, do not forget that you have reading to do for next class: Black Men in Public Space by Brent Staples.
There will be a quiz on the reading.

Monday, April 3:
As announced in class today, be sure to review “Paragraph Basics” (Eggers 9–26) before Wednesday's class.
We will continue working on practice writing for the Final Exam.

Wednesday, March 22:
Since I was unable to be in class today, Professor O'Connor was kind enough to cover for me and proctor an  in-class writing assignment: Select a short nursery rhyme other than “Three Blind Mice” and rewrite it using two different levels of diction. That is, one version should be informal, colloquial, as if you are telling a story to a friend; the second should be as wordy and pretentious as possible, using ridiculously exaggerated diction, as in the example provided. You should have been able to complete this within the allotted time, as it was intended to take just about an hour or so. In addition, you should have picked up all old work.

I have also posted information about the Writing Center's MLA Research and Documentation Workshops on the main page under Additional Recommended Events; attending one of the workshops or other events listed and submitting a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera) can earn you one one point each; these points will be used to offset absences if you are in jeopardy due to excessive absences, one point per absence.

I have made changes to the schedule; make note of the readings and assignments for the next few classes:
 

Mon.,
 27 Mar

 Creating Varied Paragraphs”: Persuasion (Eggers 67–75);
 “Punctuation” and “Mechanics” (Norton P-1 through P-11)

 Online Exercises due:

Commas: Review
Semicolon: Review
End Punctuation: Review
Quotation Marks: Review
Question Marks: Punctuation
Apostrophes: Review
Capitalization: Review
Italics: Review

 Additional, optional exercises:

*Commas: Independent Clauses, Commas: Introductory Words, Commas: Series, Commas: Nonrestrictive Clauses, Commas: Parenthetical, Commas: Quotations etc, Commas: Addresses & Dates

*Semicolon: Independent Clauses, Semicolons: Series

*Quotation Marks: Quotations, Quotation Marks: Titles, Double and Single Quotation Marks

*Apostrophes: Possessives, Apostrophes: Contractions, Apostrophes: Possessives & Plurals

*Capitals: Proper Nouns, , Capitals: Titles & Sentences

*Italics: Titles, Italics: Non-English Words

*Colons, Dashes, Parentheses, and Brackets

*Hyphens: Compounds, Hyphens: Word Breaks

*Abbreviations: Review

*Numbers

Wed.,
 29 Mar

 Ben Mattlin, “Wheelchair Guys Are All Alike.” New York Times. 11 March 2012. Web (Handout)

Mon.,
 3 Apr

 Ortiz Cofer, “The Myth of the Latin Woman  ” (.pdf - Handout)

 *See also,   “Don't Cry for Me, Argentina” from Evita
     Maria” from West Side Story
     La Bamba” by Los Lobos  (music video featuring scenes from La Bamba,
     with Lou Diamond Philips as Ritchie Valens)

Wed.,
 5 Apr

 Staples, “Black Men in Public Space” (,pdf - Handout)

 *See also,  Jan, Tracy. “Harvard Professor Gates Arrested at Cambridge Home.” Boston Globe 20 Jul 2009.
           http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2009/07/harvard.html
      Podhoretz, Norman. “My Negro Problem - And Ours.” Commentary Feb. 1963: 93-101.
     
Santos, Fernanda and Michael Wilson. City Councilman Jumaane D. Williams Is Handcuffed at
           West Indian Day Parade .” New York Times 5 Sep. 2011. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/06/
           nyregion/city-councilman-jumaane-d-williams-is-handcuffed-at-west-indian-day-parade.html
.

Friday, March 17:
For Monday, March 20, be sure to read  “Words” in the Norton Online Handbookespecially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2),  and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4). There will be an in-class writing assignment and/or homework. Also, do not forget to complete the online exercises listed on the schedule for Monday:

Appropriate Words - 1, Appropriate Words - 2, Precise Words,

Commonly Confused Words - 1, Commonly Confused Words - 2, Commonly Confused Words - 3

Empty Words and Expletives, Wordy Phrases and Redundancies

In addition, revisions of the practice essay are due. As always, to submit a revision, you must include the original graded essay and/or draft(s) along with your revision, as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, including one paragraph each on content, organization, and cosmetics.  However, this time do not staple your essay to the original: staple the revision and the one-page explanation, but do not staple them to the bluebook. Rather, submit the bluebook separately. And, as always, incomplete submissions will be returned unread.

On Wednesday, March 22, we may have class in the computer lab, Y-A/B, in the Writing Center, Bradley Hall ; I will let you know Monday, either in class or via email after class.

Tuesday, March 14:
On Wednesday, March 15, the college may remain closed, or we may have a delayed opening, in which case morning classes may not be held, or we might have a normal school day. Unfortunately, I will probably not know until late this afternoon at the earliest, and possibly not before tomorrow morning. Due to this current uncertainty, I am leaving the schedule flexible for now. In case we do have class, read “Words” (Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4). If we meet, there will be an in-class assignment, as well as homework.

Update: Due to inclement weather, all classes, including online classes, services and activities at Nassau Community College that begin prior to 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, March 15 are canceled. All classes and activities will resume at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 15. This means our class will not meet; I will adjust the schedule and send out an update before the weekend.

Saturday, March 11:
For Monday, March 13, be sure to read the handout, Yasmine Bahrani, “Racial Identity in America: Can't We Just Be Ourselves?” (a.k.a. “Why Does My Race Matter?”); there will be a quiz

Also, read “Words” (Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4). There will be an in-class assignment, as well as homework.

Tuesday, March 7:
Be sure to read  “Creating Varied Paragraphs”: How-to and Process (Eggers 53–58) for tomorrow.
In addition, we will review elements of sentence grammar that you should have covered already in the Norton Online Handbook, including the Online Grammar Exercises.

Sunday, February 26:
I hope you have had a restful and productive break. Remember to read “Creating Varied Paragraphs”: Narration and Description (Eggers 40–48) and  Jewelle L. Gomez, “The Event of Becoming” (Handout), as well as “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5) by Monday, and complete and submit the online exercises: Adjectives and Adverbs 1, Adjectives and Adverbs 2, Modifier Placement. For each, remember to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (BB) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

I will return Essay 2 and revisions of Essay 1, both of which were due in class on Wednesday, February 15. As per the syllabus and class instructions, only those revisions submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in three paragraphs, were reread; incomplete submissions will be returned ungraded.

See you tomorrow.

Friday, February 17:
Revisions of Essay 1 were due in class on Wednesday, February 15; as per the syllabus and class instructions, revisions must be substantially revised and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

Failure to submit the revision as required will result in its not being read or evaluated.

In addition, Essay 2 was also due in class on Wednesday. Instructions were provided in class, as well as posted on the main page:

Begin with the in-class paragraph you did on February 1, in response to one of the two prompts (Eggers 99):

  • Tell about a time you changed in some way. Explain in detail how you changed and what caused the change to happen.
     

  • Think of two words that best describe you and explain how these qualities are exemplified in you.

Starting with the ideas you already have, spend at least ten minutes prewriting and expand the topic into a well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essay. Be sure to focus carefully, and remember that these are formal essays: they must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction, body, and conclusion; and have a clear, explicit, assertive thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined) and use appropriate topic sentences and transitions to guide the reader. Remember to include details, evidence, examples, or other support for your assertions; the more support you include, the stronger and more convincing your essay will be. Your final essay should have an introduction, at least two body paragraphs, and a conclusion. See “Building Essays out of Paragraphs” (Eggers 154–163).

For Monday, February 27, be sure to read “Creating Varied Paragraphs”: Narration and Description (Eggers 40–48) and  Jewelle L. Gomez, “The Event of Becoming” (Handout), as well as “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5). Also, complete the following online exercises: Adjectives and Adverbs 1, Adjectives and Adverbs 2, Modifier Placement. For each, remember to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (BB) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Enjoy the break.

Thursday, February 9:
Revisions of Essay 1 are due in class on Wednesday, February 15. Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, or if you submit a plagiarized essay, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” If you did not submit a completed essay on time, according to the syllabus, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” However, this one time, I will allow you to bring a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, review it with a tutor, revise it, and submit that for at least partial credit.

In addition, Essay 2 is also due in class on Wednesday, February 15. Instructions and topic choices are here.

As per the syllabus, essays must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. All essays must also include a proper heading, including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; and contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement. (Thesis statements must be underlined). Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

In addition to the assigned readings for Monday (“Building Essays out of Paragraphs” in Eggers, 154–165, and Gloria Naylor, Mommy, What Does Nigger Mean?), do not forget to complete the online readings and Online Exercises. In The Norton Online Handbook read “Subject-Verb Agreement” and “Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement” (Norton S-5 and S-6a). (Use the icon at the bottom left to display the Table of Contents.) After you have completed the reading, click on and complete each of the following multiple-choice exercises:

S-V Agreement Review,
S-V Separated,
Compound Subjects,
Subject after Verb,
Collective Nouns,
Indefinite Pronouns,
Who, That, Which,
Pronoun Review,
Pronoun Agreement

For each, be sure to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (BB) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Finally, I have posted additional recommended events on the main page:

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

Tuesday/Thursday Club Hour Series: 11:30 am to 12:45 pm

Thursday, March 2

Library L 233-A

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, March 7 Library L 233-A

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 7 Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, March 14 Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 21 Library L 233-A

Understanding and Using Verb Tense

Thursday, March 23 Bradley Hall Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

Tuesday, March 28 Library L 233-A

Using Correct Punctuation

Tuesday, March 30 Bradley Hall Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Wednesday Afternoon Series: 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm, Bradley Hall Ballroom

Wednesday, March 1

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

Wednesday, March 8

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

Wednesday, March 15

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

Wednesday, March 22

Bradley Hall Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Tuesday Evening Series

Tuesday, Feb.14
 5:30-6:50 pm

G 233

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, Feb. 28
 5:30-6:50 pm

Library L 233-A

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 21
 7:00-8:20 pm

G (Room TBD)

Using Correct Punctuation

Tuesday, March 28
 7:00-8:20 pm

Library L 233-A

Using Correct Punctuation

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

Thursday, February 2:
In addition to the assigned readings for Monday (“Complete Sentences,” pages 9–26 in Eggers, Steps for Writers), do not forget to complete the online readings and Online Exercises.

In The Norton Online Handbook read “Complete Sentences,” “Fragments,” and “Comma Splices and Fused Sentences” (Norton S-1, 2, and 3).
(
Use the icon at the bottom left to display the Table of Contents.)

After you have completed the reading, click on and complete each of the following multiple-choice exercises:

Sentence Elements

Clauses

Phrases

Identifying Fragments

Editing Fragments

Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

Editing Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.

For each, be sure to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong.
If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again.
Be sure to include your full name, section (BB) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Finally, remember that you must revise and expand your diagnostic essay. This essay must be typed, in 12-point Times New Roman font, double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. Essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation. Your essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

Sunday, January 29:
In addition to the assigned readings for tomorrow, we will discuss The Norton Online Handbook and Online Exercises.

Friday, January 26:
I have posted the following additional recommended events on the main page:

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling

Academic Success Workshops

It's “About Time”: Managing Time, Self, & College
February 7, 11:30am - 12:45pm - M206
February 14, 11:30am - 12:45pm - M206

Being Successful in an Online Class
March 23, 11:30am -12:45pm - G149

Learning Skills Workshops
(It is recommended that students attend all four of the following)

  1. Listening/Note-Taking
    March 7, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  2. Studying and Organizing For Classes 
    March 14, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  3. Reading College Textbooks
    March 21, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  4. Test-Taking
    March 28, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  5. Managing Test Anxiety
    April 18, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206
    April 25, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M20

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

Wednesday, January 24:
Be sure to read “To the Student” (Eggers xx-xxii), “Introduction: Visualizing the Paragraph in Context” (xxiii-xxv), and “The Writing Process” (2-8) as announced in class last week. We will discuss the writing process and techniques for beginning writing assignments, both paragraphs and essays.

In addition, if you were absent on Monday and did not complete the diagnostic essay, you may write it tonight and bring it to class tomorrow. As you are not writing it in class, it should be typed (12-point Times New Roman), double spaced; include your name, course and section, instructor, and date in the upper left corner. Select one of the following topics, and compose a formal essay. Your essay will not receive a grade, nor will it affect your final average; this is for evaluative purposes only. You should take approximately one hour to complete this essay; do not use more than 75 minutes, the total length of the class period.. (Use of “I” is allowed.)

  1. 1. Many students begin their college careers anxious about how a particular weakness, handicap, disadvantage, or “difference” will keep them from prospering academically and/or socially. Discuss one personal characteristic that you suppose will present challenges to your academic success and/or social contentment, and then discuss a realistic strategy that will help you work your way through or around these challenges.

     
  2. 2. Use the following as your thesis: I’m proud of being_______________________, but it’s not without its problems.
    You should try to think of something you are genuinely proud of, but something that comes with complications as well. This is a personal narrative in a way, but the second half, about the problems, requires you to consider opposite sides of an issue.

Thursday, January 19:
As previously announced and as per the syllabus, on Monday, January 23, students will write an essay in class for diagnostic purposes only. This is both to establish a baseline for your writing, against which to measure your progress, and to determine what each individual's students strengths and weaknesses might be. You do not need to bring anything except pens (blue or black ballpoint) and notepaper; if you do not have notepaper, bluebooks will be provided.

For Wednesday, January 24, be sure to read “To the Student” (Eggers xx-xxii), Introduction: Visualizing the Paragraph in Context” (xxiii-xxv), and The Writing Process” (2-8) as announced in class.

Monday, January 16:
The main page and syllabus have both bee updated for the Spring 2017 semester.
The schedule will be updated during the course of the semester.

Classes begin tomorrow, Tuesday, January 17; our first meeting is at 9:00 on Wednesday, January 18 in North Hall, Room 112.

Tuesday, January 10:
Due to last minute schedule changes, I have just been assigned this course.
The main page and syllabus will be updated before the start of the Spring 2017 semester.

 

 

Legal Notice and Disclaimer